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Wudang Taijiquan—Zhan-Zhuan, Sequence, and Martial Applications. 108-posture Taijiquan sequence for beginners and experienced Tai Chi practitioners of all styles. With warm up exercises, martial applications, and standing meditation with English narration, and repeated in original Chinese narration by Master Zhou.…

Wudang Taijiquan Preview-VIMEO

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Wudang Taijiquan—Zhan-Zhuan, Sequence, and Martial Applications. 108-posture Taijiquan sequence for beginners and experienced Tai Chi practitioners of all styles. With warm up exercises, martial applications, and standing meditation with English narration, and repeated in original Chinese narration by Master Zhou.
Learn the Mysterious Art of Wudang Taiji, which is essentially a Yang-style form. Beautiful Wudang Mountain is the world’s largest Daoist center. Dating back 2,000 years, it spans 321 square kilometers with 72 peaks, dozens of architectural masterpieces, many lakes, rivers, and a forest which still sustains over 600 known medicinal herbs. Daoism is an ancient Chinese philosophy that teaches its practitioners to live a peaceful, refined life in harmony with nature. Centuries ago, Daoist philosophy, such as yin/yang theory, was adopted into the martial arts trained by the monks of the Wudang monasteries, and Taijiquan (Tai Chi Chuan) was created.

Taijiquan, or ‘Grand Ultimate Fist’, combines the internal skills of yang sheng (life nourishing) with ancient fighting techniques. Practiced slowly, Taijiquan is a set of gentle, flowing movements which promotes exceptional health and well-being. Taijiquan emphasizes the development of a strong root, proper body alignment, efficient movement, and a calm and relaxed mind and body. The application of Taijiquan reveals it is an effective martial art specializing in using softness to overcome hardness, uprooting the opponent, redirecting incoming force, and striking vital points.

This program discusses the history of Wudang Taijiquan, offers a Warm Up section, and teaches the essential skill of Zhan-Zhuang, or standing meditation, which develops the Qi (energy) throughout your body. The complete 108-posture Wudang Taijiquan sequence is demonstrated, and each posture is instructed separately with martial applications. Each technique is taught and demonstrated in detail, making it easy for the viewer to learn. The ancient art of Wudang Taijiquan has much wisdom to offer beginners and experienced Tai Chi practitioners of all styles.

7 Video Lessons (English/Chinese) / 144 Minutes / 2 Hours 24 Minutes (duplicated for multi-language)

Features performances by senior YMAA Instructors Nicholas C. Yang and Adison Martin.

Daoist monk Zhou, Xuan-Yun (Mysterious Cloud), grew up in a temple on Wudang Mountain, China where he was a student and later an instructor of Taiji and Kung Fu. He belongs to the Orthodox Unity sect of Daoism, and is trained in ritual arts, chanting, divination, and internal alchemy. At the age of 20, Xuan Yun left Wudang Mountain to live as a wandering monk. He traveled alone around China for four years, in order to seek out and dialogue with fellow martial artists. In 2005, Xuan Yun moved to Dali City, in Southwest China’s Yunnan Province, where he dedicates himself to sharing the martial arts. With over ten years of teaching experience, he has taught students of all ages and from over 25 different countries. He has been featured in several Chinese documentaries on the martial arts. Xuan Yun also enjoys hiking, plays the bamboo flute and is a great cook.

Master Zhou, Xuan-Yun currently divides his time between China and the United States. In China, he offers classes on traditional Wudang martial arts, Qi Gong, and Daoist philosoply. He also teaches workshops in the United States. Private instruction with Zhou, Xuan-Yun is available for those who wish to study an unusual form or a specific weapon. These include sword, saber, whip, staff, and horse-tail whisk. The horse-tail whisk is a weapon practiced exclusively by Daoist monks, and until recently, was only practiced in secret.

As of 2008, Zhou, Xuan-Yun is a featured writer for Kung Fu Tai Chi magazine. He is formally recognized as a disciple of Li Guang Fu 李光富 Head Daoist monk on Wudang Mountain (武当山道教协会会长). Master Zhou resides and teaches in New Hampshire, USA at his retreat center.

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